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Here is an example of how you can convert a situation analysis into a results chain.

First iden­ti­fy the rel­e­vant com­po­nents of the full sit­u­a­tion analy­sis asso­ci­at­ed with a key chal­lenge. This is shown in Fig­ure 6 where the rel­e­vant com­po­nents of the wind ener­gy sit­u­a­tion analy­sis are shown in col­or and the remain­der is grayed out. This helps focus on expect­ed changes from imple­ment­ing a strat­e­gy while clar­i­fy­ing addi­tion­al dri­vers that may influ­ence effec­tive­ness of the strat­e­gy, or non-tar­get changes that may present oppor­tu­ni­ties or risks.

Relevant aspects (shown in color) of situation analysis for wind energy development in the Central Great Plains whole system

Fig­ure 6

Then iden­ti­fy how the con­ser­va­tion strat­e­gy (action) will affect con­ser­va­tion and human well-being ele­ments. This is shown in Fig­ure 7 where red text empha­sizes expect­ed changes in the sys­tem that may result from the con­ser­va­tion strat­e­gy. Each link reflect­ed in the results chain should artic­u­late a testable hypoth­e­sis about cause and effect. Results chains should depict changes in pri­ma­ry inter­ests (in this case, grass­land extent, con­nec­tiv­i­ty and qual­i­ty) as well as oth­er expect­ed changes (in ital­ics; e.g. increased recre­ation­al oppor­tu­ni­ties, decreased res­pi­ra­to­ry disease).

 

Results chain for wind energy development in the Central Great Plains whole system

Fig­ure 7